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Motorists parking downtown can now choose from more than 130 new stalls in the Library Parkade on Ellis Street.

The top three floors of the expanded five floor parkade have opened gradually to the public during the last couple of weeks. The first and second floors will remain under construction into the fall.

Completion of the project is anticipated for October and is expected to create an additional 197 parking stalls, bringing the total at the parkade to 668.

Ground level retail space along Ellis Street will create a more pedestrian friendly space.

In addition, maintenance of the existing parkade will occur over the next two months and will necessitate some short-term closures. Work will include minor concrete repairs, interior painting and application of a new protective deck coating. This work is being completed now before the upcoming increase in demand related to opening of the Okanagan Center for Innovation and Community Health & Services Centre.

Parking rates in the Library Parkade are $1 per hour or $6 for the day. Other than for special events and at boat launches, parking in most city-owned lots is free during evenings, weekends and holidays.

Once construction is complete, secure bike parking will be available in the Library Parkade. For $12 per month, cyclists can store their bike in a dedicated rental locker at this location and at others throughout the downtown core. For more information and to check availability, contact Kelowna parking at 250-862-8585.

The City offers a live map listing available public and private parking lots, accessible parking stalls as well as a printable downtown parking map at kelowna.ca/parking.

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FREE COMMUNITY EVENTS THIS SUMMER IN KELOWNA

Great family activities
Kelowna’s parks are buzzing with excitement with the return of the City of Kelowna’s Park & Play program and Dancing in the Park. The free community programs are a great way to meet new people in the community and stay active as a family throughout the summer.

“These programs are really what we feel Kelowna is all about – bringing the community together to have a memorable experience and enjoying the amazing park spaces that we have in this city,” said Louise Roberts, Manager of Community & Neighbourhood Programs.

Park & Play runs from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m./dusk on weeknights all summer long at a variety of parks throughout the city with games and activities suitable for all ages.

Park

Location

Day & Dates

Loseth Park

1535 Loseth Dr.

Monday, July 4, 11, 18 & 25

Ben Lee Park

900 Houghton Rd.

Tuesday, July 5, 12*, 19 & 26

Curlew Park

5120 Lark St.

Wednesday, July 6, 13, 20 & 27

Blair Pond Park

333 Clifton Rd.

Thursday, July 7, 14, 21 & 28*

Jack Robertson Park

1655 Willow Cres.

Friday, July 8, 15, 22 & 29

Davie Park

300 Davie Rd.

Monday, August 1, 8, 15 & 22

Cameron Park

2345 Richter St.

Tuesday, August 2, 9, 16 & 23*

Sumac Park

372 Phipps Cres.

Wednesday, August 3, 10, 17, 24

Sonora Park

1634 Sonora Dr.

Thursday, August 4, 11*, 18 & 25

Quarry Park

4882 Quarry Ct.

Friday, August 5, 12, 19 & 26

Events marked with * are in conjunction with Parks Alive! and also include musical entertainment. Visit festivalskelowna.com for the entertainment schedule.

Dancing in the Park kicked off this week with a huge turnout and will continue to run every Wednesday in July and August at Stuart Park from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

Date

Dance Theme

July 6

Zumba

July 13

Hip Hop

July 20

Groove Method

July 27

Hot Jams

August 3

Throwback Night

August 10

Hot Latin Nights

August 17

Line Dancing

August 24

Grand Finale Dance Party

August 31

Retro Roller Night (6:30 – 8 p.m.)

Parents and guardians are reminded that they are responsible for the care and supervision of their children. It’s also encouraged to use active transportation such as walking or biking to get to these events and to bring reusable water bottles.

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Council Highlights

04/20/2016 08:45 AM PDT

 

April 18, 2016
Cultural Report Card

Council received information about the 2016 Cultural Report Card, an infographic which documents progress on implementation of the Cultural Plan in four focus areas, including investment, conversations, activity and visibility. Highlights include new initiatives such as the Cultural Access Pass, increased municipal cultural investment, high levels of citizen satisfaction with cultural facilities and programs, and continuation of the successful artsVest program. To review the report card, visit kelowna.ca/culture.

Water regulations

Council received information about proposed updates to the Water Regulation Bylaw, including implementation of permanent water use restrictions, reduction of the complexity and cost associated with meeting landscape irrigation requirements, provisions to improve compliance, and addressing identified issues with temporary water use. For more information, visit kelowna.ca/watersmart.

Okanagan Rail Trail

Council supported the Trail Development Plan for the Okanagan Rail Trail corridor. Key features include a 4.6-metre-wide continuous route of public access, with a finished surface of compacted crushed aggregate, pedestrian and bicycle crossings, conversion of existing bridges for safe public use and installation of signage. For more information, visit kelowna.ca/OKRailCorridor.

Tax distribution policy

Council approved updates to the Municipal Tax Distribution Policy, which adjust 2015 tax class ratios (e.g. residential, industrial, business, farm) and reflect the 2016 assessment changes in property market values. Based on 2015 information on municipalities over 75,000 populations, Kelowna has the third lowest Business Class ratio and was one of nine that had a Business class ratio under 3.00. For more information, visit kelowna.ca/propertytax.

2030 Infrastructure Plan

Council adopted the 2030 Infrastructure Plan, which strikes an affordable balance of infrastructure projects that maintain levels of service, preserve existing assets, and provide opportunity for growth and economic development. For more information, visit kelowna.ca/2030Kelowna.

 

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Rolling road closures for Vaisakhi Parade

04/20/2016 08:30 AM PDT

 

Traffic Advisory
On Saturday, Apr. 30, the Okanagan Sikh Temple and Cultural Society is hosting its sixth annual Vaisakhi Parade. To accommodate the event, rolling road closures will be in effect from approximately 11:45 a.m. to 3 p.m. Times are approximate depending on the speed of the parade.

Rutland Road N. will be closed from McCurdy Road to Wallace Road from 11:30 a.m. until approximately 1 p.m. Rolling closures will continue along Wallace Road, Sycamore Road, Sumac Road, Friesen Road, McCurdy Road and Keyes Road. McCurdy Road will be closed from Rutland Road to Craig Road from approximately 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Truck route closure signage will be posted on Highway 33 and Rutland Road. Detour signs for motorists using Rutland Road as well as traffic control personnel will be visible along the affected residential streets. Motorists may experience minor disruptions and are advised to plan their routes accordingly to avoid delays.

Transit service will be detoured along Aldon Road. Visit bctransit.com under Kelowna for route and schedule information.

Street parking restrictions along Aldon will be in effect to accommodate transit as well along Rutland Road (Wallace to McCurdy Roads) to accommodate parade marshaling.

For information about parking, road closures and potential delays, visit kelowna.ca/roadreport.

 

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YLW wants your feedback on Airport Lands

04/19/2016 12:00 PM PDT

 

Kelowna International Airport (YLW) will be hosting an Open House concerning airport lands in the Agricultural Land Reserve (ALR) on Thursday, April 21, from 4 to 7 p.m. Citizens will have the opportunity to provide valuable feedback on YLW’s application to exclude key properties from the ALR.

“YLW is looking to exclude four properties, totaling 22 hectares, from the ALR,” said Shayne Dyrdal, Senior Airport Finance Manager. “Although currently within the ALR, the lands haven’t been farmed for many years, due to restrictions relating to airport proximity.”

If the exclusion application is supported by the public and Agricultural Land Commission (ALC), property south of the terminal building will be used for terminal complex expansion, while property east of the runway will create opportunity for additional airside facilities including fueling, maintenance and cargo.

“We’re looking for citizens to identify issues and provide critical input on the exclusion application,” said Sam Samaddar, Airport Director. “We know that decision-making processes are significantly improved on a regional and provincial scale when the community is involved in the discussion.”

Anyone wishing to express an interest in the application is encouraged to attend Thursday’s Open House, which will take place on YLW’s second floor mezzanine. Parking is free in the long-term lot, with validation. Alternatively, comments may be forwarded in writing to City of Kelowna, 1435 Water Street, Kelowna, BC, V1Y 1J4, Attention: Shayne Dyrdal.

 

Posted by & filed under CREA.

Thu, 07/16/2015 – 13:30

The Bank of Canada announced on July 15th, 2015 that it was lowering its trend-setting target overnight lending rate from 0.75 per cent to 0.50 per cent. The move follows another cut of the same size in January.

The Bank of Canada announced on July 15th, 2015 that it was lowering its trend-setting target overnight lending rate from 0.75 per cent to 0.50 per cent. The move follows another cut of the same size in January.

The Bank indicated that it expects the Canadian economy shrank modestly in the first half of the year but has begun to rebound and will gain steam. While its decision to lower interest rates is aimed at supporting business investment and exports, revisions to the Bank’s economic forecast also indicate that lower interest rates will also boost consumer spending and housing activity.

The Bank of Canada also pared back its inflation outlook due to a number of factors which are unlikely to reverse themselves in the near future. That means short-term interest rates are almost certain to remain on hold this year and over 2016.

Recall that when the Bank of Canada previously cut interest rates by a quarter of a percentage point in January, Canada’s largest private banks lowered their lending rates by less than that. The same will likely hold true this time around. Accordingly, the Bank of Canada’s most recent interest rate cut is unlikely to cause consumer borrowing and mortgage lending to catch fire, especially given the currently high level of household debt.

The bottom line has shifted from “lower for longer” to “even lower for even longer”. All other things being equal, this is even more supportive for the housing market.

As of July 15th, 2015, the advertised five-year lending rate stood at 4.64 per cent, unchanged from the previous Bank rate announcement on May 27th, and down 0.15 percentage points from one year ago.

The next interest rate announcement will be on September 9th, 2015 and the next update to the Bank of Canada’s economic forecast will be on October 21st 2015.

(CREA 07/15/2015)

Posted by & filed under CREA.

Wed, 07/15/2015 – 09:00

Ottawa, ON, July 15, 2015- According to statistics released today by The Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA), national home sales activity edged slightly lower on a month-over-month basis in June 2015.

Highlights:

  • National home sales edged back by 0.8% from May to June.
  • Actual (not seasonally adjusted) activity stood 11% above June 2014 levels.
  • The number of newly listed homes edged down 0.2% from May to June.
  • The Canadian housing market remains balanced overall.
  • The MLS® Home Price Index (HPI) rose 5.43% year-over-year in June.
  • The national average sale price rose 9.6% on a year-over-year basis in June; excluding Greater Vancouver and Greater Toronto, it increased by 3.1%.

The number of home sales processed through the MLS® Systems of Canadian real estate Boards and Associations declined by 0.8 per cent in June 2015 compared to May. Sales levels in May and June marked the strongest monthly readings in more than five years.

June sales were up from the previous month in about half of all local markets, led by increases in Hamilton-Burlington and in the Durham Region of the Greater Toronto Area. The monthly increase in sales there was offset by monthly sales declines in Ottawa and Montreal.

“Low interest rates are unquestionably helping boost consumer confidence and home sales activity this summer,” said CREA President Pauline Aunger. “But low interest rates are benefiting sales in some areas more than others. All real estate is local, with trends affected by a combination of local and national factors. REALTORS® remain your best source for information about sales and listings where you live or might like to in the future.”

“Low interest rates are helping sales activity set new records in and around the Greater Toronto Area, which is boosting national sales activity,” said Gregory Klump, CREA’s Chief Economist. “Those records would be even higher were it not for an ongoing shortage of listings for single family homes in the area. The combination of strong demand and a shortage of listings is continuing to fuel single family home price increases.”

Actual (not seasonally adjusted) activity in June 2015 set a record for the month, standing 11 per cent above levels reported for the same month last year and 14 per cent above the 10-year average for the month.

Actual (not seasonally adjusted) sales were up on a year-over-year basis in about two-thirds of all local markets, led by activity in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia, Greater Toronto, Hamilton-Burlington, and Montreal.

The number of newly listed homes was little changed (-0.2 per cent) in June compared to May, marking the third consecutive month in which they remained stable. There was roughly an even split between the number of local markets showing an increase in new listings and those showing a decline.

The national sales-to-new listings ratio was 57.2 per cent in June. Although little changed from its reading the previous month, it is up from the low of 50.4 per cent reached in January when it reached its most balanced point since March 2013. The ratio has risen steadily along with sales over the first half of the year while new supply has remained stable.

A sales-to-new listings ratio between 40 and 60 per cent is generally consistent with balanced housing market conditions, with readings above and below this range indicating sellers’ and buyers’ markets respectively.

The ratio was within this range in about half of local housing markets in June. About one-third of all local markets breached the 60 per cent threshold in June, comprised mostly of markets in British Columbia together with those in and around the Greater Toronto Area.

The number of months of inventory is another important measure of the balance between housing supply and demand. It represents the number of months it would take to completely liquidate current inventories at the current rate of sales activity.

There were 5.6 months of inventory on a national basis at the end of June 2015, unchanged from a month earlier when it reached its lowest reading in three years. The national balance between supply and demand has tightened since the beginning of the year, when it was at its most balanced in nearly two years.

The Aggregate Composite MLS® HPI rose by 5.43 per cent on a year-over-year basis in June, accelerating slightly by comparison to the 5.17 per cent year-over-year gain logged in May. Gains have generally held within the range of between five to five and a half per cent since the beginning of 2014.

Year-over-year price growth picked up in June for single family homes, slowed for apartment units, and was little changed for townhouse/row units.

Two-storey single family homes continue to post the biggest year-over-year price gains (+7.65 per cent), with comparatively more modest increases for one-storey single family homes (+4.43 per cent), townhouse/row units (+4.00 per cent) and apartment units (+2.64 per cent).

Year-over-year price growth varied among housing markets tracked by the index. Greater Vancouver (+10.26 per cent) and Greater Toronto (+8.94 per cent) continue to post by far the biggest year-over-year price increases. By comparison, Fraser Valley, Victoria, and Vancouver Island prices all recorded year-over-year gains of about four per cent in June.

Price gains in Calgary continued to slow, with a year-over-year increase of just 0.48 per cent in June. This was the smallest gain in nearly four years and marks a full year of monthly slowdowns in the rate of year-over-year price growth.

Elsewhere, prices held steady on a year-over-year basis in Saskatoon and Ottawa and rose slightly in Greater Montreal. By comparison, prices fell by almost three and a half per cent in Regina and by about two per cent in Greater Moncton.

The MLS® Home Price Index (MLS® HPI) provides a better gauge of price trends than is possible using averages because it is not affected by changes in the mix of sales activity the way that average price is.

The actual (not seasonally adjusted) national average price for homes sold in June 2015 was $453,560, up 9.6 per cent on a year-over-year basis.

The national average home price continues to be upwardly distorted by sales activity in Greater Vancouver and Greater Toronto, which are among Canada’s most active and expensive housing markets. If these two markets are excluded from calculations, the average is a more modest $346,904 and the year-over-year gain is reduced to 3.1 per cent.

- 30 -

PLEASE NOTE: The information contained in this news release combines both major market and national sales information from MLS® Systems from the previous month.

CREA cautions that average price information can be useful in establishing trends over time, but does not indicate actual prices in centres comprised of widely divergent neighbourhoods or account for price differential between geographic areas. Statistical information contained in this report includes all housing types.

MLS® Systems are co-operative marketing systems used only by Canada’s real estate Boards to ensure maximum exposure of properties listed for sale.

The Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA) is one of Canada’s largest single-industry trade associations, representing more than 109,000 REALTORS® working through some 90 real estate Boards and Associations.

Further information can be found at http://crea.ca/statistics.

Posted by & filed under CREA.

Mon, 06/15/2015 – 09:00

Ottawa, ON, June 15, 2015 – According to statistics released today by The Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA), national home sales activity posted a fourth consecutive month-over-month increase in May 2015.

Highlights:

  • National home sales rose 3.1% from April to May.
  • Actual (not seasonally adjusted) activity stood 2.7% above May 2014 levels.
  • The number of newly listed homes was little changed from April to May.
  • The Canadian housing market remains balanced overall.
  • The MLS® Home Price Index (HPI) rose 5.17% year-over-year in May.
  • The national average sale price rose 8.1% on a year-over-year basis in May; excluding Greater Vancouver and Greater Toronto, it increased by 2.4%.

The number of home sales processed through the MLS® Systems of Canadian real estate

Boards and Associations rose 3.1 per cent in May 2015 compared to April. This marks the fourth consecutive month-over-month increase and raises national activity to its highest level in more than five years. (Chart A)

May sales were up from the previous month in about 60 per cent of all local markets, led by increases in the Greater Toronto Area, Calgary, Edmonton, Ottawa and Montreal.

“CMHC announced in April that effective June 1 it was hiking mortgage default insurance premiums for homebuyers with less than a 10% down payment, so some buyers may have jumped off the fence and purchased in May to beat the increase,” said CREA President Pauline Aunger. “It’s one of the factors that could have affected sales last month. That said, all real estate is local, with trends that reflect a combination of local and national factors. REALTORS® remain your best source for information about sales and listings where you live or might like to in the future.”

“Sales in and around the Greater Toronto area played a starring role in the monthly increase in May sales,” said Gregory Klump, CREA’s Chief Economist. “At the same time, the rebound in sales over the past few months in Calgary and Edmonton suggests that heightened uncertainty among some home buyers in these housing markets may be easing.”

Actual (not seasonally adjusted) activity in May 2015 stood 2.7 per cent above levels reported for the same month last year and 5.7 per cent above the 10 year average for the month.

Sales were up on a year-over-year basis in about half of all local markets, led by activity in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia, Greater Toronto and Montreal.

The number of newly listed homes was virtually unchanged (-0.2 per cent) in May compared to April. This reflects an even split between housing markets where new listings rose and where they fell, with little monthly change for new listings in most of Canada’s largest and most active urban markets.

The national sales-to-new listings ratio was 57.6 per cent in May, up from a low of 50.4 per cent in January when it reached its most balanced point since March 2013. The ratio has risen steadily along with sales so far this year as new supply has remained little changed.

A sales-to-new listings ratio between 40 and 60 per cent is generally consistent with balanced housing market conditions, with readings above and below this range indicating sellers’ and buyers’ markets respectively. The ratio was within this range in about half of local housing markets in May. About a third of local markets were above the 60 per cent threshold in May, comprised mostly of markets in and around the Greater Toronto Area and markets in British Columbia.

The number of months of inventory is another important measure of the balance between housing supply and demand. It represents the number of months it would take to completely liquidate current inventories at the current rate of sales activity.

The national balance between supply and demand has tightened since the beginning of the year, when buyers had more negotiating power than they had in nearly two years. There were 5.6 months of inventory on a national basis at the end of May 2015, its lowest reading in three years.

The Aggregate Composite MLS® HPI rose by 5.17 per cent on a year-over-year basis in May, up slightly from the 4.97 per cent year-over-year gain logged in April. Gains have generally held to the range from five to five and a half per cent since the beginning of 2014. (Chart B)

Year-over-year price growth accelerated in May in all Benchmark home categories tracked by the index with the exception of one-storey single family homes.

Two-storey single family homes continue to post the biggest year-over-year price gains (+7.18 per cent), with more modest increases for one-storey single family homes (+4.11 per cent), townhouse/row units (+4.09 per cent) and apartment units (+2.91 per cent).

Year-over-year price growth varied among housing markets tracked by the index. Greater

Vancouver (+9.41 per cent) and Greater Toronto (+8.90 per cent) continued to post by far the biggest year-over-year price increases. By comparison, Fraser Valley, Victoria, and Vancouver Island prices all recorded year-over-year gains of about four per cent in May.

Price gains in Calgary continued to slow, with a year-over-year increase of just 1.21 per cent in May. This was the smallest gain in more than three years and the eleventh consecutive monthly slowdown in year-over-year price growth.

Elsewhere, prices held steady on a year-over-year basis in Saskatoon and Ottawa, rose slightly in Greater Montreal and fell by about three per cent in Regina and Greater Moncton.

The MLS® Home Price Index (MLS® HPI) provides a better gauge of price trends than is possible using averages because it is not affected by changes in the mix of sales activity the way that average price is.

The actual (not seasonally adjusted) national average price for homes sold in May 2015 was $450,886, up 8.1 per cent on a year-over-year basis.

The national average home price continues to be upwardly distorted by sales activity in Greater Vancouver and Greater Toronto, which are among Canada’s most active and expensive housing markets. If these two markets are excluded from calculations, the average is a more modest $344,988 and the year-over-year gain is reduced to 2.4 per cent.

- 30 -

 

PLEASE NOTE: The information contained in this news release combines both major market and national sales information from MLS® Systems from the previous month.

 

CREA cautions that average price information can be useful in establishing trends over time, but does not indicate actual prices in centres comprised of widely divergent neighbourhoods or account for price differential between geographic areas. Statistical information contained in this report includes all housing types.

MLS® Systems are co-operative marketing systems used only by Canada’s real estate Boards to ensure maximum exposure of properties listed for sale.

The Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA) is one of Canada’s largest single-industry trade associations, representing more than 109,000 REALTORS® working through some 90 real estate Boards and Associations.

Further information can be found at http://crea.ca/statistics.

For more information, please contact:

Pierre Leduc, Media Relations
The Canadian Real Estate Association
Tel.: 613-237-7111 or 613-884-1460
E-mail: pleduc@crea.ca

Posted by & filed under CREA.

Mon, 06/15/2015 – 08:58

Ottawa, ON, June 15 2015 - The Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA) has updated its forecast for home sales activity via the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) Systems of Canadian real estate Boards and Associations for 2015 and 2016.

While oil prices have firmed up recently, they remain well down from where they were a year ago and their outlook remains uncertain. The extent to which lower oil prices will continue to weigh on the Canadian economy also remains uncertain. In the Prairie region, this is dampening consumer confidence and sidelining potential homebuyers.

When CREA published its previous forecast in March, a rush of homeowners in Alberta had listed their property for sale. Since then, new supply has sharply pulled back. CREA’s forecast remains for a continued gradual improvement in home sales and housing market conditions in oil-producing provinces in line with further gradual oil price gains.

Home sales elsewhere in Canada are continuing to evolve mostly as expected, with the exception of a slower than expected spring market in Nova Scotia due to extraordinarily inclement weather and stronger than expected sales activity across much of British Columbia.

Low rise property markets remain tight in parts of British Columbia and Ontario. These are the only two provinces where a shortage of listings for low rise homes is expected to fuel average price gains above inflation this year.

In other provinces, listings have begun to decline but remain elevated. Average prices across the Prairies, Quebec and the Atlantic region are unlikely to see much in the way of price growth over the forecast horizon as sales gradually deplete listings.

The forecast for national sales in 2015 has been revised upward, reflecting stronger than anticipated activity in British Columbia. National sales are now projected to rise by 1.3 per cent to 487,200 units in 2015, which is slightly above its 10-year annual average.

British Columbia is projected to post the largest annual increase in activity in 2015 (+12.2 per cent), while Alberta and Saskatchewan are expected to post the largest annual sales declines (-18.2 per cent and -12.9 per cent respectively). Modest changes in annual home sales are forecast for all other provinces.

 

The forecast for national average home price growth has been revised upward to $429,400 for an annual increase of 5.2 per cent in 2015. This reflects forecast average price gains in British Columbia and Ontario together with a projected increase in their proportion of national sales. British Columbia is expected to be the only province where average price rises faster (8.5 per cent) than the national average, while the rise in Ontario’s average price (5.6 per cent) is predicted to be roughly in line with the national increase.

Average prices are projected to remain largely stable in other provinces this year, with annual changes ranging between plus or minus one per cent. The exception is Alberta, where average price is forecast to slip by 2.8 per cent amid a pullback in higher-priced property sales activity.

In 2016, national sales activity is forecast to reach 491,200 units, a further annual gain of 0.8 per cent. The increase reflects an anticipated rise in sales activity in Alberta and Saskatchewan, in line with a gradual improvement in their economic outlook.

Although sales in British Columbia are expected to remain strong in 2016, it is the only province where they are forecast to moderate (-2.9 per cent) due to stretched affordability. Strengthening economic prospects should translate into slow and steady gains in other provinces where home sales have struggled in recent years while prices remained more affordable due to an elevated supply of listings.

The national average price is forecast to rise by a further 1.7 per cent to $436,700 in 2016, with larger percentage increases in British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, and Ontario. Price growth in 2016 is forecast to be strongest in Ontario (+2.6 per cent) due to an ongoing supply shortage of listings for low rise homes in and around the Greater Toronto Area. An improvement in the share of higher-priced sales activity is anticipated to boost average prices in Alberta (+2.4 per cent).

Gains of around two per cent are forecast for British Columbia and Manitoba, and around one per cent for Saskatchewan and Quebec. Average home prices in the Atlantic region are forecast to hold steady in 2016.

- 30 -

About The Canadian Real Estate Association

The Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA) is one of Canada's largest single-industry trade associations, representing more than 100,000 real estate Brokers/agents and salespeople working through more than 100 real estate Boards and Associations.

For more information, please contact:

Pierre Leduc, Media Relations
The Canadian Real Estate Association
Tel.: 613-237-7111 or 613-884-1460
E-mail: pleduc@crea.ca­

 

Posted by & filed under CREA.

Systems Administrator (12 Months Contract)

Tue, 06/02/2015

Reports to:
Manager, ITS Operations

Type of position:
12 Months Contract

General Description:
Provide second level of support; participate in the design, architecture, deployment, monitoring maintenance and turning of highly available physical and virtual systems, web applications and infrastructure to deliver quality IT services, optimize performance and maintain service levels.

Responsibilities:

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